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The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and all science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead: his eyes are closed.
Albert Einstein (via jonathanmoore)

russianpencil:

In general, iPad styluses follow an incorrect cognitive mapping. The vast majority of them are designed to look and feel like a pen. Why? Writing or drawing on the iPad feels nothing like using a pen or pencil. For one, the fidelity is way too low. Also, it is pretty awkward to rest your palm…

fortheloveofchairs:

Moonbow by Wendell Castle. His work is always wonderful.

fortheloveofchairs:

Moonbow by Wendell Castle. His work is always wonderful.

oktotally:

the shrutes produce thirsty babies

oktotally:

the shrutes produce thirsty babies

theatlantic:

Kim Jong-Il, 1942-2011

Early this morning, North Korean state television reported the death of North Korea’s longtime ruler Kim Jong Il. Kim reportedly died two days earlier, on Saturday, December 17, 2011, suffering a heart attack while riding on a train outside Pyongyang. The 69-year-old had been North Korea’s “supreme leader” since 1994, after succeeding his father, Kim Il Sung, the founder of the communist state. Kim Jong Il presided over a long-suffering, isolated nation, antagonized the western world, indulged himself while millions starved, and funneled much of the country’s meager funds into military spending and the pursuit of nuclear weapons. His nominal successor, son Kim Jong Un, remains untested and the sudden power vacuum in such an unpredictable nation has neighbors, allies, and enemies on edge. Collected here are images from the life and times of North Korea’s Kim Jong Il, and a few recent images from the reclusive country and those who have noted his passing. 
Above: A South Korean man gestures toward a picture of the late North Korean leader Kim Jong-il as he reads the reports of his death on the newspaper company’s display board in Seoul, South Korea, on December 19, 2011. (Reuters/Kim Kyung-Hoon)

See more photos at The Atlantic

theatlantic:

Kim Jong-Il, 1942-2011

Early this morning, North Korean state television reported the death of North Korea’s longtime ruler Kim Jong Il. Kim reportedly died two days earlier, on Saturday, December 17, 2011, suffering a heart attack while riding on a train outside Pyongyang. The 69-year-old had been North Korea’s “supreme leader” since 1994, after succeeding his father, Kim Il Sung, the founder of the communist state. Kim Jong Il presided over a long-suffering, isolated nation, antagonized the western world, indulged himself while millions starved, and funneled much of the country’s meager funds into military spending and the pursuit of nuclear weapons. His nominal successor, son Kim Jong Un, remains untested and the sudden power vacuum in such an unpredictable nation has neighbors, allies, and enemies on edge. Collected here are images from the life and times of North Korea’s Kim Jong Il, and a few recent images from the reclusive country and those who have noted his passing. 

Above: A South Korean man gestures toward a picture of the late North Korean leader Kim Jong-il as he reads the reports of his death on the newspaper company’s display board in Seoul, South Korea, on December 19, 2011. (Reuters/Kim Kyung-Hoon)

See more photos at The Atlantic